On the Betelguese's path: A timeline for it's future

Here's something interesting for you all. Observe the night sky carefully, and try to find out the star Betelguese. It's easy to f...


Here's something interesting for you all. Observe the night sky carefully, and try to find out the star Betelguese. It's easy to find- here's the trick. There are three stars lined up together in the sky, easily seen across India and actually all over the world. They form the Orion's Belt. I am attaching a photo so you may understand how to find it out. 



The interesting this is, that Betelguese, a red supergiant in the Orion constellation, in the near astronomical future (which may be within the next million years, or even a year since) will explode and convert itself into a supernovae. The explosion will be seen precisely 642 years later after the incident actually takes place. Why is this so? It's because it's distance is 642 light years. Light takes 642 years to reach us. At that point, Betelguese will give out gamma rays. The gamma rays are sort of a hell for any celestial object that gets in it's path. For example, if earth was in it's path, it'd get charred within seconds. But there isn't actually any reason to worry. The gamma rays comes out from the poles of the new supernovae, and travel in a straight line. Luckily enough, earth isn't in the path of it's poles, in other words, Betelguese's poles DO NOT point towards the earth. However, the explosion will create a dramatic phenomenon.

The thing is, since Betelguese is so near to the Earth, it's conversion into a supernovae will make the night sky turn into semi-day, because the gamma rays are quite, quite bright. Expect to see two "Suns" in the day, as well as in the night, for a period of about 2-3 weeks. A perfect example of a duplicate of the Aurura that is observable in the poles. It will completely outshine the other stars making planetary observation impossible from the Earth. 


     One can expect to see two similar "suns" in the sky when this phenomenon happens.

There is still a lot of time. There isn't much reason for us to worry now. We are not going to be alive when this finally explodes. A 'near' in astronomical terms is a long way. Chances of the phenomenon occurring tomorrow or the next year is very, very less. It'll happen one fine day. One day, and observers of the future generations armed with computerized telescope shall be filled with awe. 

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